Event Title

Keynote Address

Introduction by

Prof. David D. Caron, UC Berkeley School of Law

Description

Recognition of Foreign Judgments: Balancing International, Federal, State, and Commercial Interests

The United States has one of the world's most liberal legal frameworks of any country for recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments. Yet the system continues to be governed by a patchwork of state laws that are based on federal common law principles dating to the 19th century. Mr. Bellinger discussed whether the current state law framework should be updated, focusing in particular on the prospects for U.S. ratification of, and passage of federal legislation to implement, the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements.

Speakers

John B. Bellinger III is a partner in the international and national security practices of Arnold & Porter LLP in Washington, DC. He advises sovereign governments and U.S. and foreign companies on a variety of international law and U.S. national security law issues. He is also an Adjunct Senior Fellow in International and National Security Law at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Mr. Bellinger served as The Legal Adviser for the U.S. Department of State under Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice from 2005 to 2009 and as Senior Associate Counsel to the President and Legal Adviser to the National Security Council at the White House from 2001 to 2005. He is a member of the Secretary of State's Advisory Committee on International Law and one of four U.S. members of the Permanent Court of Arbitration in the Hague.

David Caron is the C. William Maxeiner Distinguished Professor of Law and Co-Chair of the Miller Institute for Global Challenges and the Law at Berkeley Law School. He is also the President of the American Society of International Law.

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Mar 13th, 12:45 PM Mar 13th, 2:00 PM

Keynote Address

Recognition of Foreign Judgments: Balancing International, Federal, State, and Commercial Interests

The United States has one of the world's most liberal legal frameworks of any country for recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments. Yet the system continues to be governed by a patchwork of state laws that are based on federal common law principles dating to the 19th century. Mr. Bellinger discussed whether the current state law framework should be updated, focusing in particular on the prospects for U.S. ratification of, and passage of federal legislation to implement, the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements.