Event Title

Immigrant Workers in the Tech Economy

Location

St. John’s Presbyterian Church

Start Date

26-2-2016 2:30 PM

End Date

26-2-2016 3:45 PM

Description

Since its inception, the United States has relied on immigrant labor: beginning with slave labor from Africa to build the foundation of the nation's agricultural economy; Europeans to work in factories and mills; Chinese to build the railroads; Filipinos and Japanese to build the Hawaiian and California agricultural economy; Mexicans to work the farms during the bracero program (1942-1965); professionals under the 1965 Immigration Act to fill critical needs in medicine, teaching and engineering; and the H-1B visa program to bring in tens of thousands of skilled engineers to work in the tech economy. Many questions have arisen concerning the impact and experience of H-1B engineers: 1) Do they take jobs away from U.S. citizens or do they create opportunities for others? 2) In a global economy in which companies scour the globe for skilled talent, what is the "relevant workforce" in determining whether certain racial or ethnic groups are under represented? 3) Are H-1B workers exploited, "held captive," or less inclined to complain because a "green card" is being promised? And 4) What does the future hold for the domestic high tech work force in a global economy?

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Feb 26th, 2:30 PM Feb 26th, 3:45 PM

Immigrant Workers in the Tech Economy

St. John’s Presbyterian Church

Since its inception, the United States has relied on immigrant labor: beginning with slave labor from Africa to build the foundation of the nation's agricultural economy; Europeans to work in factories and mills; Chinese to build the railroads; Filipinos and Japanese to build the Hawaiian and California agricultural economy; Mexicans to work the farms during the bracero program (1942-1965); professionals under the 1965 Immigration Act to fill critical needs in medicine, teaching and engineering; and the H-1B visa program to bring in tens of thousands of skilled engineers to work in the tech economy. Many questions have arisen concerning the impact and experience of H-1B engineers: 1) Do they take jobs away from U.S. citizens or do they create opportunities for others? 2) In a global economy in which companies scour the globe for skilled talent, what is the "relevant workforce" in determining whether certain racial or ethnic groups are under represented? 3) Are H-1B workers exploited, "held captive," or less inclined to complain because a "green card" is being promised? And 4) What does the future hold for the domestic high tech work force in a global economy?