Event Title

Thelton E. Henderson Center’s Ruth Chance Lecture

Location

Berkeley Law, Room 110

Start Date

4-3-2013 12:45 PM

End Date

4-3-2013 2:00 AM

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Description

The legacy of the Voting Rights Act illustrates both the need for broad-based coalitions and the importance of strategy/sustainability in crafting civil rights statutory language. This lecture discussed the historical underpinnings of the VRA, including commentary on the 2006 reenactment, and a discussion of the need for the VRA, including Section 5, beyond the 25 years Congress authorized in 2006. This lecture also touched on the ways that the VRA, envisioned to enfranchise all voters, but primarily Blacks, has now been applied to other communities of color, namely Latinos and Asian Americans. What does the initial intent of the VRA mean for communities of color amidst an assault on voting rights by states that are covered jurisdictions under Section 5 and those practice minority vote dilution in violation of Section 2?

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Mar 4th, 12:45 PM Mar 4th, 2:00 AM

Thelton E. Henderson Center’s Ruth Chance Lecture

Berkeley Law, Room 110

The legacy of the Voting Rights Act illustrates both the need for broad-based coalitions and the importance of strategy/sustainability in crafting civil rights statutory language. This lecture discussed the historical underpinnings of the VRA, including commentary on the 2006 reenactment, and a discussion of the need for the VRA, including Section 5, beyond the 25 years Congress authorized in 2006. This lecture also touched on the ways that the VRA, envisioned to enfranchise all voters, but primarily Blacks, has now been applied to other communities of color, namely Latinos and Asian Americans. What does the initial intent of the VRA mean for communities of color amidst an assault on voting rights by states that are covered jurisdictions under Section 5 and those practice minority vote dilution in violation of Section 2?